Introduction to Human Computer Interaction (HCI)

This page is about a class offered in a previous quarter. It is not current.

Schedule

Week Meeting 1 Meeting 2 Sunday, 11:59
1 Observing Project Intro RR1 Intro Survey
2 What is UX? [S1] Ethics RR2 D0
3 [S2] Interviewing
Meeting on T+W only
4 Values RR3 [S3] Problems RR4
5 Critical Design RR5 [S4] Data
6 Presentation I [S5] Inclusion RR6 D1
7 Brainstorming [S6] Storyboarding
8 Human Factors RR7 [S7] Prototyping & Evaluation D2
9 HCI History RR8 [S8] HCI Present RR9
10 Choose your own adventure I RR10 Choose your own adventure II RR10 D3
F Final: Presentation II Friday: Final Reflection

Finals Week: The final meeting is scheduled by the registrar and is considered an integral part of the course. Make plans now to attend at the proper time for your section.

Can I attend the other class meeting sometimes?

No! Not only are we limited by the seats in the room, we will often be doing project work in class, and so you need to be there at the same time as your group :)

Deadlines

Reading responses & sketchbook entries are due promptly at the start of class. Most other deadlines will be on Sundays at 11:59p.

Week 1

Meeting 1: Observing

… and Sketching!

Meeting 2: Project Intro

… sketching details, and how to read academic papers!

  • Read Before Class [RR1]:
    • Dombrowski, Lynn, Adriana Alvarado Garcia, and Jessica Despard. 2017. “Low-Wage Precarious Workers’ Sociotechnical Practices Working Towards Addressing Wage Theft.” In Proceedings of the 2017 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 4585–4598. CHI ‘17. New York, NY, USA: ACM. http://doi.acm.org.proxy.lib.pdx.edu/10.1145/3025453.3025633.
  • In Class:
    • Video: Suchman Copier
    • Q&A, Course Goals & Outcomes
      • What makes a good sketch?
    • Reading Strategies for Academic Papers
    • Discussion: Wage Theft + HCI
    • What makes a good project topic?
    • Slides

Survey: Sun, Jan 12

Week 2

Meeting 1: What is UX?

What are we doing in this class anyway? What is UX Design & Research?

Meeting 2: UX Research Ethics

D0: Sun, Jan 19

Week 3

Class will meet only once this week, on either Tuesday or Wednesday depending on your section. The university is closed for MLK Day on Monday.

Meeting 1: Interviewing

Week 4

Meeting 1: Values

Meeting 2: Problems

Week 5

Meeting 1: Critical Design

When design isn’t about fixing things

Meeting 2: Making Sense of Data

Week 6

Meeting 1: Presentations

D1P: Research Presentation

Meeting 2: Inclusion

D1: Sun, Feb 16

Week 7

Meeting 1: Brainstorming

Meeting 2: Storyboarding

Week 8

Meeting 1: Human Factors & Foundations

In this class we will look at some things we already know about people! And discuss how this knowledge can be applied to design. It is not always necessary to reinvent the wheel with new research ;)

We signed up for readings in Week 7, meeting 1. The list is on Canvas. You do NOT need to read ALL of these things, only the one topic area that you signed up for (or I assigned you to if you were not present).

Meeting 2: Prototyping & Evaluation

D2: Sun, March 1

Week 9

Meeting 1: HCI History

  • Read Before Class [RR8]:
    • Moggridge, Bill. 2007. “Interviews with Stu Card and Tim Mott.” In Designing Interactions, 1st ed. MIT Press. PDF (GDrive)
  • In Class:
    • Possible presentation from folks who attended Safiya Noble talk
    • HCI History Discussion Slides
    • Project team work time

Meeting 2: HCI Present

Week 10

Meeting 1: Choose Your Own Adventure 1

  • In week 9 you will sign up to read and share somethign with the rest of the class on just one day in week 10. This activity will count for 2 reading response grades. [RR10]

    • Ideas if you are stuck:
      • Seaver, Nick. 2018. “Captivating Algorithms: Recommender Systems as Traps.” Journal of Material Culture, December. https://doi-org.proxy.lib.pdx.edu/10.1177/1359183518820366.
      • Irani, Lilly C., and M. Six Silberman. 2016. “Stories We Tell About Labor: Turkopticon and the Trouble with ‘Design.'” In Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 4573–4586. CHI ‘16. New York, NY, USA: ACM. http://doi.acm.org.proxy.lib.pdx.edu/10.1145/2858036.2858592.
      • Srinivasan, Janaki, Megan Finn, and Morgan Ames. 2017. “Information Determinism: The Consequences of the Faith in Information.” The Information Society 33 (1): 13–22. https://www-tandfonline-com.proxy.lib.pdx.edu/doi/full/10.1080/01972243.2016.1248613.
      • Harrington, Christina, Sheena Erete, and Anne Marie Piper. 2019. “Deconstructing Community-Based Collaborative Design: Towards More Equitable Participatory Design Engagements.” Proc. ACM Hum.-Comput. Interact. 3 (CSCW): 216:1–216:25. https://doi-org.proxy.lib.pdx.edu/10.1145/3359318.
      • Keyes, Os, Josephine Hoy, and Margaret Drouhard. 2019. “Human-Computer Insurrection: Notes on an Anarchist HCI.” In Proceedings of the 2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 339:1–339:13. CHI ’19. New York, NY, USA: ACM. https://doi-org.proxy.lib.pdx.edu/10.1145/3290605.3300569.
      • Noopur Raval and Paul Dourish. 2016. Standing Out from the Crowd: Emotional Labor, Body Labor, and Temporal Labor in Ridesharing. In Proceedings of the 19th ACM Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work & Social Computing (CSCW ’16). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 97–107. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/2818048.2820026
      • Mariam Asad. 2019. Prefigurative Design as a Method for Research Justice. Proc. ACM Hum.-Comput. Interact. 3, CSCW, Article 200 (November 2019), 18 pages. https://doi.org/10.1145/3359302
      • Mariam Asad and Christopher A. Le Dantec. 2015. Illegitimate Civic Participation: Supporting Community Activists on the Ground. In Proceedings of the 18th ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work & Social Computing (CSCW ’15). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 1694–1703. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/2675133.2675156
      • Vasiliki Tsaknaki, Marisa Cohn, Laurens Boer, Ylva Fernaeus, and Anna Vallgårda. 2016. Things Fall Apart: Unpacking the Temporalities of Impermanence for HCI. In Proceedings of the 9th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction (NordiCHI ’16). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, Article 141, 1–3. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/2971485.2987680
      • Lucian Leahu, Marisa Cohn, and Wendy March. 2013. How categories come to matter. In Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI ’13). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 3331–3334. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/2470654.2466455
      • Sarah Fox. 2018. Design, Maintenance, and the Menstruating Body. In Proceedings of the 2018 ACM Conference Companion Publication on Designing Interactive Systems (DIS ’18 Companion). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 375–378. https://doi.org/10.1145/3197391.3205386
      • Stephanie B. Steinhardt and Steven J. Jackson. 2015. Anticipation Work: Cultivating Vision in Collective Practice. In Proceedings of the 18th ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work & Social Computing (CSCW ’15). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 443–453. https://doi.org/10.1145/2675133.2675298
      • Vera Khovanskaya and Phoebe Sengers. 2019. Data Rhetoric and Uneasy Alliances: Data Advocacy in US Labor History. In Proceedings of the 2019 on Designing Interactive Systems Conference (DIS ’19). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 1391–1403. https://doi.org/10.1145/3322276.3323691
      • Richmond Y Wong, Vera Khovanskaya, Sarah E Fox, Nick Merrill, and Phoebe Sengers. 2020. Infrastructural Speculations: Tactics for Designing and Interrogating Lifeworlds. UC Berkeley. In Proceedings of the 2020 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computer Systems http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/3313831.3376515 Author pre-print available at: https://escholarship.org/uc/item/4bm4g0fn
  • In Class:

    • Jigsaw groups to share readings.
    • Project team work time

Meeting 2: Choose Your Own Adventure 2

  • See notes on meeting 1. You will select a topic in week 8.

  • In Class:

    • Jigsaw groups to share readings.
    • Closing Discussion, Course Evaluation

D3: Sun, Mar 15

Finals Week

Final Exam Period

There is no final exam in this course. Instead, the final meeting will be used for final presentations. The time of this meeting is scheduled by the registrar and is considered an integral part of the course. You must plan to attend at the scheduled time.

IR: Fri, March 20