Current Classes (Winter 2019)

Introduction to programming and computer science, for students with no prior programming experience.

This course is designed to be a pre-CS 161 course for students who are not computer science majors, might benefit from a more accessible pace, do not have a strong math or computing background, and/or want to explore programming and computer science.

This course will introduce you to the fundamental principles of human-computer interaction (HCI), more often referred to as “User Experience” in industry and professional contexts. You will try out a variety of research and design techniques through a team-based human-centered design project.

You will not become a UX expert in a single 10-week course, but you will leave this course with a better understanding of what skills you might wish to develop further on your own or in future coursework.

Previously Offered Classes

This course includes a survey of topics related to the social, ethical, and legal implications of computing, including: the history of computing, the social context of computing, professional and ethical responsibilities, the risks and liabilities of safety-critical systems, intellectual property, privacy and civil liberties, the social implications of the Internet, computer crime, and economic issues in computing.

Introduction to programming and computer science, for students with no prior programming experience.

This course is designed to be a pre-CS 161 course for students who are not computer science majors, might benefit from a more accessible pace, do not have a strong math or computing background, and/or want to explore programming and computer science.

This course is the Sophomore Inquiry (SINQ) course for the University Studies “Freedom, Privacy, and Technology” cluster. As described on the UNST website: The aim of this cluster is to provide the knowledge that will enable those who complete the cluster to face thoughtfully the question of the appropriate use of and limitations upon modern technology. One important feature of the cluster is that it brings together actual sciences with humanistic and social science disciplines.

This course will introduce you to the fundamental principles of human-computer interaction (HCI), more often referred to as “User Experience” in industry and professional contexts. It will expose you to a wide variety of research and design techniques through a team-based human-centered design project.
This course includes a survey of topics related to the social, ethical, and legal implications of computing, including: the history of computing, the social context of computing, professional and ethical responsibilities, the risks and liabilities of safety-critical systems, intellectual property, privacy and civil liberties, the social implications of the Internet, computer crime, and economic issues in computing.