Frame Questions Back to Main FAQ

MacOS 8 - Buy It Now
Join the Mac OS 8 Web Campaign!

This page has had .

For general information on frames check out Netscape's Web site (http://www.netscape.com).

For more links to information on frames, see Ken Tidwell's CHP Resources Page.


1. What are frames and what can I use them for?

2. How do I create frames in CHP?


1. Question: What are frames and what can I use them for?

Answer: Frames are a mechanism to divide the browser window into several subwindows, or "frames" (panes, sections, etc.) The contents of each frame is a seperate document. The central element of a frame set-up is the Frame Layout page. This page defines the frames, which documents appear in each frame, and what non-frame browsers see. Frames are employed button bars, documents where the author wishes to have a header, logo, or something displayed at all times. Frames can also speed up the way the browser renders the page. When you change the document displayed in a frame, only that frame needs to be updated, so the whole page is not redrawn. Go to Netscape's Website for more information on frames.


2. Question: How do I create frames in CHP?

Answer: To make a frame document in CHP, select "New Frame Layout" from the "File" menu. Then, using the commands in the Frame menu or in the toolbar, divide the one frame to your heart's content. To set which document you want in each frame, there are several methods:

1. Double-click in the frame, and the Frame (Object) Editor will appear. Now either type in the URL of the files in the URL field, use the pop-up menu to the right of the field to select a currently open document or a recent link, or, in CHP 2.0, click the browse button to choose the file using a standard dialog box.

2. Click in the frame, and then open the Link Editor. Now either type in the URL of the files in the URL field, use the pop-up menu to the right of the field to select a currently open document or a recent link, or click the browse button to choose the file using a standard dialog box.

3. Drag a document from the Finder onto the frame.

Use the three other modes: Edit, Preview, and Source, to set what browsers NOT capable of frames will see. This version is called the NOFRAMES version for the HTML tags which mark it.

Some people leave a message for non-frames users along the lines of: "Click here if you are not using a frames-capable browser." link. The fact is, the ONLY people who will see that link (and everything else between the <NOFRAMES> tags) will be those who are not using a frames-capable browser. In general, it is easiest to the NOFRAMES space to make a non-frames version of what is in your frames. CHP makes this relatively easy. Just open your frameset and use edit mode, and you will design the NOFRAMES part of the page.If you really must have non-framers go to another page, there is no need to bring in frames in to your "Click Here" line. Unless of course you are a frame supremacist and want everyone not using the latest versions of Netscape to be aware at all times of how lowly they are in the browser hierarchy.

In order to see how the document looks WITH frames, you will have to open it with a frames capable browser.

Note: Each frame has its own background image or color. For information on setting background images and colors, see the Image Questions. TOP


Created by: Marcin Jeske (jeskem@ee.pdx.edu)

 Made with Macintosh and Claris Home Page